Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Call for Submissions for the ASIL Midwest Works-in-Progress Conference

The American Society of International Law (ASIL) Midwest Interest Group is hosting its fourth annual research forum at the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law in Cleveland, Ohio on September 15-16, 2017. The goal is to create a friendly, open conversation about works in progress and to foster a Midwestern United States international law community. To that end, the workshop will include both full drafts and early works in progress.  

Those interested in presenting at the conference should send a 500-word abstract to ASIL-Midwest Co-Chair Cindy Buys at Southern Illinois University Law School by Friday, July 28, 2017. Please also include a sentence about the stage the paper is expected to be in by September (e.g., reasonably complete draft, early work in progress, etc.). Papers may address any International Law topics, and this Call for Submissions is open to everyone in the international legal community. Preference will be given to ASIL members who are also members of the ASIL-Midwest Interest Group. Paper presenters will be asked to circulate their drafts (or a summary of the project if it's early stage) to workshop attendees no later than September 1, 2017.

Those interested in serving as a commentator for a paper should also send an email to the Co-Chair Cindy Buys by July 28. Commentators will be asked to prepare five to eight minutes of comments on one or more of the papers. Those interested in presenting are also encouraged to comment on the other papers and should indicate whether they are willing to serve as commentators as well.

ASIL members and Cleveland-Marshall College of Law faculty, staff, and students may attend for free. Participants who are not ASIL members or Cleveland-Marshall College of Law affiliates will be required to pay a $50 registration fee (includes workshop and some meals) for the conference. Participants are responsible for their own travel and hotel expenses. More details regarding transportation, hotels and other logistics will be provided shortly.

(cgb)

July 19, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Save the Dates! Upcoming ABA International Conferences

The American Bar Association Section of International Law, with more than 20,000 members around the world, has some of the most interesting and productive conferences you'll find. Here's a list of upcoming events. Visit the ABA Section of International Law website for more information on any particular conference or forum.

   
Oct 20-22, 2017: Pre-Fall Conference Module (San Juan, Puerto Rico)
Oct 24-28, 2017: Section of International Law Fall Conference (Miami, Florida)
Jan 31-Feb 6, 2018: ABA/Section Midyear Meeting (Vancouver, Canada)
April 17-21, 2018: Section of International Law Annual Conference (New York City)
June 10-12, 2018: Europe Forum (Copenhagen, Denmark)

(mew)

July 11, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, July 10, 2017

Having Ivanka Trump Sitting at the G-20 Negotiation Table Between British Prime Minister Theresa May and Chinese President Xi Jinping was wrong, wrong, wrong.

When U.S. President Donald Trump was at the G-20 summit in Germany, he had his daughter Ivanka sit in for him at the negotiating table. Can you imagine the outrage if any world leader from the other countries in the G-20 got up from the table to be replaced by their son or daughter? This is not done. At a minimum, this sends confusing messages to other world leaders about who is in power in the country. Having Ivanka Trump sitting between British Prime Minister Theresa May and Chinese President Xi Jinping was wrong, wrong, wrong. The correct protocol would have been to have the U.S. Secretary of State take his place at the negotiating table, not his daughter.

Or he could have stayed at the negotiating table, as the other world leaders did.

It was also wrong of Donald Trump to refer to Xi Jinping as the President of Taiwan. This was a great embarrassment for the United States and for the People's Republic of China.

As for the summit itself, a headline from the front page of The Washington Post from July 9, 2017 captures it best: Summit Exposes Trump's Isolation -- Leaders Express Anxiety at G-20 -- Defiance of Climate Pact Threatens Global Alliances.

(mew)

July 10, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, July 9, 2017

Immigration Law Update for Employment Lawyers and Corporate Counsel

The International Law Committee of the American Bar Association Tort Trial and Insurance Practice Section (TIPS)  has partnered with the Employment and Law Committee on an upcoming Audio Webinar scheduled for July 25th, 2017 at 1:00 p.m. EST  - "Immigration Law Update for Employment Lawyers and Corporate Counsel."  

This webinar will be beneficial for any attorney advising business segments, employers, or foreign nationals on hiring and compliance issues involving immigration law. Attendees will be provided with an overview of the Immigration Reform and Control Act and requirements imposed on employers and foreign nationals by immigration laws. 

Registration and further information about the program can be found by clicking here

Hat tip to Stacey H. Wang.

(mew)

July 9, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Washburn is Hiring an Assistant Director of Academic Support and Bar Readiness.

The Washburn University School of Law invites applications for the position of Assistant Director of Academic Support and Bar Readiness. This is a full-time, twelve-month, nontenure-track position designed to support the Director of Academic Support and Bar Readiness.  (The official job posting can be found by clicking here).

  • With respect to the Academic Support program this position will support and/or teach in academic success courses, work one-on-one with students on academic probation or at academic risk to help them develop habits and methods to improve their academic performance, and design and implement periodic assessments of academic support programs to identify program facets that offer opportunities for continuous improvement.
  • With respect to the Bar Readiness program, this position’s duties include coordinating and providing instruction during the winter and summer bar preparation initiatives, coaching and supporting students and alumni as they prepare for the bar exams, offering active learning workshops on bar essay writing and on multiple choice test taking skills, and reading and critiquing student practice essays.

The Washburn campus is located in the heart of Topeka, Kansas, blocks from the state capitol. Recently, the Topeka and Shawnee County Library was named the 2016 Library of the Year, the highest honor for libraries in the U.S. and Canada. Topeka has previously been named a Top Ten City in Kiplinger’s magazine. Topeka features affordable housing and beautiful, historic neighborhoods filled with well-maintained parks. It is also the home of the Brown v. Board of Education historical site.

Required Qualifications: Juris Doctor degree from an ABA approved law school, with a strong academic record, and successful completion of a bar exam. Background demonstrating a potential for excellence in academic support. Understanding of legal pedagogy including current trends. Strong oral presentation skills and ability to remediate complex legal rules. Excellent written communication and legal writing skills. Ability to manage multiple tasks and meet deadlines. Demonstrated ability to work with a diverse student body and work collaboratively with faculty and staff. Proficiency with Microsoft Excel and PowerPoint. Must have passed a state or uniform bar exam and hold a current license to practice law.

Preferred Qualifications: Experience running a law school academic support program or other relevant teaching or tutoring experience. Law practice experience. Experience using TWEN, D2L, and Banner.

Application Procedures: Submit a letter of interest, resume, Resume Supplement form (available at //www.washburn.edu/hrforms), copy of unofficial transcript(s) for highest level of postsecondary education (official transcript for all levels of postsecondary education may be requested upon hire), and names and phone numbers of three professional references to getajob@washburn.edu or to Washburn University Human Resources, 118 Morgan Hall, 1700 SW College, Topeka, Kansas 66621. Applicants are encouraged to submit complete applications by July 17, 2017. Applications will continue to be reviewed until interviews are scheduled.  

Salary is upper $60,000 to lower $70,000 commensurate with qualifications. Washburn provides an excellent fringe benefits package. Employment at Washburn University will be conditioned upon satisfactory completion of a background check.

Hat tip to Associate Dean Joseph Mastrosimone.

(mew)

July 9, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, July 3, 2017

First Law School in Bhutan Opens Today

Congratulations to the Jigme Singye Wangchuck School of Law, the first law school in the history of the Kingdom of Bhutan. The law school is welcoming 25 fortunate law students from all across Bhutan. They begin their orientation classes today, Monday, July 3, 2017.
Opening the first law school in any country is a tremendous accomplishment. Special congratulations to the visionary Bhutanese leaders and lawyers who are supporting this new school, and to Michael Peil and Judy Stark, who have devoted several years to making this special day possible.
For those of you who would like to know  more about the school, the New York Times did a story about the law school back in October 2016.
The law school's website is www.jswlaw.bt
(mew)

 

July 3, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, June 30, 2017

German Bundestag Approves Same-Sex Marriage

Joining other countries that have recognized a need to protect the legal rights of same-sex couples, and understanding that this requires full marriage equality for same-sex couples, the German Bundestag voted today to approve marriage for same-sex couples.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel and her conservative party had blocked votes on the same-sex marriage legislation. To the surprise of many, she eased her opposition and allowed a free vote to deputies in her party. Although many reports stated that she had dropped her opposition to same-sex marriage, Merkel herself voted against the legislation, which passed by a vote of 393 to 226 with 4 abstentions and 7 members absent.

Click here to read more about the Bundestag vote.

Some conservative German lawmakers appeared to threaten a constitutional challenge to the legislation, but the Grundgesetz für die Bundesrepublik Deutschland (the Basic Law for the German Federal Republic, the German Constitution) says in Article 6(1) only that "Marriage and the family are under the special protection of the state." [In German: "Ehe und Familie stehen unter dem besonderen Schutze der staatlichen Ordnung."]. Article 6(1) does not further define "marriage" (or "family") and thus would not support any constitutional challenge to the legislation.

The legislation now goes to the Bundesrat for its formal approval, which is expected. The bill then goes to the German President, Frank-Walter Steinmeier, for his signature. Germany will become the 23rd country to allow same-sex marriage (unless Malta gets there first).

Rex Wockner keeps the best up-to-date list of where same-sex marriage is legal. Click here to have a look.

Hat tip to rw. 

(mew)

June 30, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, June 29, 2017

Call for Presenters for the AALS Section on North American Cooperation at the 2018 AALS Annual Meeting in San Diego

The Association of American Law Schools Section on North American Cooperation has announced a call for presenters from which two or more additional presenters will be selected for the section’s program during the AALS 2018 Annual Meeting in San Diego. The session topic is: “What Would a New NAFTA Look Like?” The program will be held on the last day of the AALS Conference, Saturday, January 6, 2018, from 10:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. The session will be co-sponsored by the AALS Section on Graduate Programs for Non-U.S. Lawyers and the AALS Section on International Legal Exchange.

Through various statements, the United States has indicated that it would seek to renegotiate the North American Free Trade Agreement between Canada, Mexico, and the United States. This roundtable will discuss questions relating to a new NAFTA, if one is negotiated, including: whether it should be expanded to include other countries (such as Chile and Peru); whether negotiators should create provisions to summarily dismiss frivolous suits (such as challenge to new regulations that corporations complain will diminish their profits); and whether a new agreement should have even stronger enforcement mechanisms for environmental and worker protection.

The panel moderators will be Section Chair Gerardo Puertas (Facultad Libre de Derecho de Monterrey, Mexico) and Section Chair-Elect Professor Lisa Black (California Western School of Law).

To submit your name as a possible presenter, please submit your name and a brief description of what you would like to contribute to the discussion. Please send an email to Professor Mark E. Wojcik at mwojcik@jmls.edu. The due date for submission is Tuesday, September 12, 2017. Members of the Section’s Executive Committee will review the proposals and select presenters. Final decisions will be made by September 20, 2017.

Like others on the panel, presenters will be responsible for paying the AALS registration fee as well as their own hotel and travel expenses.

If you have any questions about the call for presenters, please contact Professor Lisa Black at California Western School of Law or Professor Mark E. Wojcik at The John Marshall Law School-Chicago, mwojcik@jmls.edu or (312) 987-2391.

June 29, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, June 23, 2017

American Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

One year ago, the General Assembly of the Organization of American States (OAS) adopted the "American Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples." Click here for an "Insight" about that Declaration from the American Society of International Law. It was authored by Stefania Errico, an Honorary Research Fellow at the Coventry University Centre for Agroecology, Water, and Resilience (United Kingdom).

Here's an excerpt:

Comprised of forty-one articles divided into six thematic sections, the American Declaration [on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples] recognizes a wide-ranging series of individual and collective rights deemed “indispensable for [indigenous peoples’] existence, well-being and integral development as peoples." According to Article XLI, these rights constitute the minimum standards for the survival, dignity, and well-being of the indigenous peoples of the Americas. In keeping with the approach commonly followed in the other instruments concerning indigenous peoples, the Declaration does not provide any definition of the term “indigenous peoples.” Rather, it relies on the criterion of self-identification according to the “practices and institutions of each indigenous people” in order to define its scope of application.

Self-Determination, Autonomy, and Participation

In its Preamble, the [American] Declaration reproduces some paragraphs of [the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP)] and recalls the historic injustices suffered by indigenous peoples, the urgent need to respect and promote their inherent rights, and the importance of eliminating all forms of discrimination against them. Strikingly, however, it does not acknowledge indigenous peoples as peoples “equal to all other peoples,” as UNDRIP had done, making explicit the link between indigenous groups as peoples and the right to self-determination. By doing that, UNDRIP acknowledges that indigenous peoples, like other peoples, have a full right to exercise self-determination, including in its external dimension, should the conditions be met.

A similar statement is not found in the American Declaration, which merely states that indigenous peoples have the right to self-determination, borrowing language from common Article 1 of the UN Covenants on Human Rights and Article 3 of UNDRIP, and lays down that in exercising this right, indigenous peoples have the right to autonomy or self-government in matters relating to their internal and local affairs, reproducing Article 4 of UNDRIP. This right is understood as a right to internal self-determination, in accordance also with the limits formulated in Article IV to safeguard “the territorial integrity or political unity of sovereign and independent States.”

(mew)

June 23, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Call for Presenters for the AALS Section on International Legal Exchange Program at the 2018 AALS Annual Meeting in San Diego

The AALS Section on International Legal Exchange is pleased to announce a call for presenters from which one or two additional presenters will be selected for the section’s program during the AALS 2018 Annual Meeting in San Diego. The session topic is: “A Global Guide to International Legal Exchange: Practical Secrets of Success and What to Do When Things Go Horribly Wrong.” The program will be held on the first day of the AALS Conference, Wednesday, January 3, 2018, from 1:30 to 3:15 p.m. The session is co-sponsored by the AALS Section on North American Cooperation.

This program will review recent changes to the ABA standards that make it easier to send U.S. law students on overseas programs sponsored by their own schools. That presentation will be made by William E. Adams, Jr. (Deputy Managing Director, ABA Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar). That introduction will be followed by a survey of successful international exchange programs, including an objective assessment of the value these exchanges should have for law students. We will also review the responsibility of schools to look after non-U.S. law students and exchange ideas on how to prevent and respond to problems that might arise in international exchange programs.

The panel co-moderators will be Professors George Edwards (Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law) and Gabrielle Goodwin (Indiana University Maurer School of Law). Confirmed speakers also include Charlotte Ku (Texas A&M University School of Law), Sue Liemer (Elon University School of Law), and Mark E. Wojcik (The John Marshall Law School-Chicago).

To submit your name as a possible presenter, please submit your name and a brief description of what you would like to contribute to the discussion. Please send an email to Professor Mark E. Wojcik at mwojcik@jmls.edu. The due date for submission is Tuesday, September 12, 2017. Members of the Section’s Executive Committee will review the proposals and select presenters. Final decisions will be made by September 20, 2017.

Like others on the panel, presenters will be responsible for paying the AALS registration fee as well as their own hotel and travel expenses.

If you have any questions about the call for presenters, please contact Professor Mark E. Wojcik at The John Marshall Law School-Chicago, mwojcik@jmls.edu.

(mew)

June 23, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, June 22, 2017

Save the Dates: ABA Section of International Law Conference in Seoul, South Korea

October 17-20, 2018

American Bar Association Section of International Law Conference, Seoul, South Korea

Theme:  Artificial Intelligence and Intellectual Property

(mew)

June 22, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

American Society of International Law Seeks Academic Partners

The American Society of International Law offers individual memberships, of course, but for several years now it has also offered law schools and other institutions the option of becoming an ASIL Academic Partner. Benefits of being an academic partnership include a 50% discount on individual ASIL memberships for students and faculty members, advertising and promotional benefits, complimentary career development services for your students, and access to a variety of ASIL-sponsored publications and events throughout the year.

Get more information by visiting www.asil.org/academicpartner

Hat tip to Tania F. Cohen, ​Partnerships Coordinator at the American Society of International Law.

(mew)

June 22, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

China Criticizes 14 Universities for Supposed Weakness in Ideology

The Central Commission for Discipline Inspection (“CCDI”) of the People’s Republic of China is the highest internal-control institution of the Communist Party of China (CPC). It enforces internal rules and regulations and combats corruption in the Communist Party. Because most Chinese government officials are also Communist Party members, the CCDI is effectively the top anti-corruption body in China. The CCDI was established in 1978.

Although it usually focuses on anti-corruption, the CCDI has recently accused 14 of China’s top-ranked universities of having weak ideological and political commitments, according to a report in the Financial Times. The universities were instructed to “take responsibility” for their ideological and political shortcomings. See Emily Feng, Political Control: Beijing Probes Universities that Fail to Toe Communist Line, Financial Times, June 20, 2017, at 2.

The 14 Chinese universities targeted include ones that have academic programs and research partnerships with prominent educational institutions in the West. Id. The Chinese universities include Peking University, Tsinghua University, and Wuhan University (which has a joint venture agreement with Duke University). Here is a link to a list of the universities criticized.

The Financial Times notes that the CCDI’s ideological report continues a trend that started in 2012, to tighten political control over all aspects of civil society including education. Emily Feng, Political Control: Beijing Probes Universities that Fail to Toe Communist Line, Financial Times, June 20, 2017, at 2. The report now comes in advance of the 19th Chinese Communist Party Congress scheduled for this Fall. Id. The CCDI had sent its inspectors to 29 universities in China earlier this year to find “political bias” and to uphold the Communist Party’s leadership. Id. 

(mew)

June 22, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (2)

Wednesday, June 21, 2017

The “Global Citizenship Law” Program at the European University Institute in Florence and the WZB Berlin has a PhD Vacancy

The “Global Citizenship Law” Project, co-hosted by the WZB Berlin Social Science Center and the European University Institute, is seeking to appoint a Research Fellow (Ph.D. Candidate) in the field of “International Law and Governance of Citizenship.”

The application deadline is July 31, 2017. Details about the Ph.D. vacancy are available here.  Details about the project are available here

Hat tip to Professor Liav Orgad, Director of Global Citizenship Governance, Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies, European University Institute and Head of the Project Group on International Citizenship Law, Migration, Integration, Transnationalization Research Unit, WZB Berlin Social Science Center.

(mew)

June 21, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Early Bird Registration Now Open for the ABA Section of International Law Fall Meeting in Miami

The American Bar Association Section of International Law will hold its 2017 Fall Conference in Miami from October 24-27, 2017. Early-Bird Registration is now open (until September 8, 2017) and the preliminary brochure is available HERE.

(mew)

June 21, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, June 20, 2017

International Human Rights Litigation: A Guide for Judges.

The U.S. Federal Judicial Center recently published a free, online guide called International Human Rights Litigation: A Guide for Judges. This Guide was written to assist federal judges in resolving federal cases involving international human rights claims, and it provides a comprehensive analysis of substantive and procedural issues involved in such cases.  The Guide includes a detailed analysis  on the Alien Tort Statute (ATS), the Torture Victim Protection Act (TVPA), and other federal statutes that we know and love.  It also includes a model scheduling order for human rights cases, case summaries, tables, and research references (current as of December 31, 2016).

The Guide was drafted to be neutral as between human rights plaintiffs and defendants, and thus should provide useful information for all. Because it was commissioned by a federal government agency (the Federal Judicial Center) for the benefit of federal judges, lawyers, and agencies, the Guide has been placed in the public domain and is available as a free resource.  And we like that. Readers can freely distribute, print, and otherwise use and transmit the Guide in its present form, provided that no changes are made to the manuscript itself.  You can find and download the Guide by searching on the FJC website or nu this link to the author’s SSRN site (Abstract ID # 2978170).

  • Recommended citation: David Nersessian, International Human Rights Litigation: A Guide for Judges 1-178 (Federal Judicial Center 2016).

Congratulations to the Federal Judicial Center and to Dr. David L. Nersessian, an Assistant Professor  at Babson College in Massachusetts.

(mew)

 

 

June 20, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, June 19, 2017

World Refugee Day

June 20 is World Refugee Day. According to the United Nations, 20 people are forced to leave their homes to escape war, persecution or terrorism every minute of the day.  In light of the unprecedented refugee crisis this year, the United Nations has launched a campaign, Stand with Refugees, to encourage action to improve the lives of refugees. What will you do today?

(cgb)

June 19, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, June 16, 2017

ASIL Midwest Call for Submissions

ASIL-Midwest, an interest group of the American Society of International Law (ASIL), is co-sponsoring its fourth scholarly works-in-progress conference at the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law in Cleveland, Ohio on September 15-16, 2017. The goal is to create a friendly, open conversation about works in progress and to foster a Midwestern United States international law community. To that end, the workshop will include both full drafts and early works in progress.

Those interested in presenting at the conference should send a 500-word abstract to ASIL-Midwest Co-Chair Cindy Buys, Southern Illinois University School of Law by Friday, July 28, 2017. Please also include a sentence about the stage the paper is expected to be in by September (e.g., reasonably complete draft, early work in progress, etc.). Papers may address any International Law topics, and this Call for Submissions is open to everyone in the international legal community.  Preference will be given to ASIL members who are also members of the ASIL-Midwest Interest Group.  Paper presenters will be asked to circulate their drafts (or a summary of the project if it's early stage) to workshop attendees no later than September 1, 2017.  

Those interested in serving as a commentator for a paper should also send an email to the Co-Chair Cindy Buys by July 28.  Commentators will be asked to prepare five to eight minutes of comments on one or more of the papers. Those interested in presenting are also encouraged to comment on the other papers and should indicate whether they are willing to serve as commentators as well.

ASIL members and Cleveland-Marshall College of Law faculty, staff, and students may attend for free. Participants who are not ASIL members or Cleveland-Marshall College of Law affiliates will be required to pay a $50 registration fee (includes workshop and some meals) for the conference. Some meals will be provided, but participants are responsible for their own travel and hotel expenses. More details regarding transportation, hotels and other logistics will be provided shortly.

For any questions about papers and presentations, please contact ASIL-Midwest Interest Group Co-Chairs, Cindy Buys or Neha Jain, University of Minnesota Law School.  For questions about conference logistics, contact immediate past-Chair, Milena Sterio, Cleveland-Marshall College of Law.

(cgb)

June 16, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

RIP Robert Brodegaard

BrodegaardWe have learned that international dispute resolution attorney Robert F. Brodegaard has died. Robert was a great advocate of promoting international dispute resolution and he organized wonderful CLE programs on the subject. He was a a partner at Robert F. Brodegaard and Associates. In his law practice, he focused on international dispute resolution and U.S. commercial litigation arising under a wide variety of domestic and foreign laws in a diverse set of industries. Over a career that lasted 42 years, he represented foreign and domestic corporations, governments, and governmental agencies in litigation, mediation, and arbitration of international commercial, investment, and intellectual property disputes, as well as representing foreign and domestic parties in connection with enforcing foreign judgments and arbitral awards. He appeared in state and federal courts around the nation. His complex commercial litigation and trial practice ranged from litigating and acting as trial counsel in cases brought under the securities, RlCO, and antitrust laws to professional malpractice, lender liability, and fraudulent conveyance claims.

Robert (Bob) was well known to many lawyers around the world because of his practice and his leadership in the American Bar Association Section of International Law. He was also active in the Association of the Bar of the City of New York; the ABA Sections on: Litigation and Antitrust Law, the Inter-American Bar Associations; the American Society of International Law; and the Union International des Avocats. He had a fantastic sense of humor and was well loved. He will be deeply missed by family, friends, and lawyers around the world.

A celebration of his life will be held on Tuesday, June 20, 2017 at the Unitarian Church of All Souls located at 1157 Lexington Avenue, in New York City.  A memorial service will begin at 6:00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations to the ASPCA in Bob Brodegaard's name via their website //www.aspca.org/donate (honor donations).

Mark E. Wojcik

June 16, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (1)

Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Save the Dates! Upcoming ABA International Conferences

The American Bar Association Section of International Law, with more than 20,000 members around the world, has some of the most interesting and productive conferences you'll find. Here's a list of upcoming events. Visit the ABA Section of International Law website for more information on any particular conference or forum.

   
Oct 20-22, 2017: Pre-Fall Conference Module (San Juan, Puerto Rico)
Oct 24-28, 2017: Section of International Law Fall Conference (Miami, Florida)
Jan 31-Feb 6, 2018: ABA/Section Midyear Meeting (Vancouver, Canada)
April 17-21, 2018: Section of International Law Annual Conference (New York City)
June 10-12, 2018: Europe Forum (Copenhagen, Denmark)

(mew)

June 14, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)